“Hidden” New York

  • Manhattan’s smallest park is .05 acres. Septuagesimo Uno, 71 for it is on 71st If you pronounce the name as you’re looking for it you’ll have past it.
  • The site of the first pedestrian fatality in America was in 1898 by an electric powered taxi. Could it have been a Tesla, humm.
  • The Amiable Child Monument of St. Clair Pollack, a five-year-old boy who fell off a cliff on July 15, 1795 across the street from U. S. Grant’s tomb.
  • The smallest building in Manhattan, 125 square feet! The owner has been offered $1.25 million that’s $10,000 a square foot! He made an incredible sculpture with over 10,000 keys.
  • The narrowest residential building in Manhattan is 8 ½ feet wide, the former home of poet Edna St Vincent Malay and Margaret Meade, anthropologist. It sold for over $3 million several years ago! The buyer opened his wallet wider then the! 🙂
  • Coggan’s Bluff, at the Brush Stairway, is the last trace of Manhattan baseball, where those without the money to purchase a ticket to the Polo Grounds would watch a Giants game by grabbing ½ a step. It’s just above Morningside Park and with binoculars you could have seen a game for free, including, Bobby Thompson’s “The shot heard around the world” in the 1951 NL playoffs to play in The World Series.
  • Pomander Walk, 27 Tudor style homes on the Upper Westside (UWS). Very quaint, Humphrey Bogart lived there with Lauren.
  • First subway station in New York was gorgeous and hasn’t been in service for quite some time! But, I know how we can see this 1904 beauty. Are you interested? There’s more!